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An advertisment  from Australian PowerBoat and Yachting Monthly that appeared regulary in the late 1940s for Norman Wright showing the diversity of craft the yard had built.

Norman R Wright and Sons

Three generations of the Wright family have been involved in designing and building craft in Brisbane Qld, since the firm was established in 1909. Norman R Wright, the first of the Wrights, learnt his trade from WH Whereat, and then designed and built luggers, skiffs, pleasure yachts, ferries and small cargo boats. The 22.85 m (75 ft) long schooner FRANCOIS was one of the outstanding vessels from the yard, and a contrast to their championship winning 18-foot skiff TAREE. A number of the Queensland 21 Foot Restricted Class yachts also came from the Wrights, but were in fact Whereat designs, a collaboration of the two leading families in the business.

During World War II the construction shifted to help the war effort and four Fairmile launches were among the many craft they built. Following the war they returned to their previous trade and continued to make a variety of vessels for pleasure and commercial use, especially craft for the Great Barrier Reef tourist resorts.

Norman Jnr, the second generation Wright, was born into the business and learnt the trade from his father and co-workers. He designed 18-foot skiffs, sail and power pleasure boats, workboats for tug companies and boats to service flying boats. He also employed Bob Miller in the late 1950s as a sailmaker. While in Brisbane and supported by the Wrights, Bob Miller designed and built the breakthrough single chine hull plywood 18-foot skiff TAIPAN, which was later followed by VENOM.

Ronald Wright, Norman Jnr's brother, was the only Wright in the firm to have ever had formal training as a naval architect. He started designing boats in 1938, retiring in 1987. He designed 16-foot skiffs, sailing yachts, pilot boats, ferries and launches.

Norman Snr gradually handed over the business to his sons, but disagreements between the two Normans, senior and junior, ended with Norman Jnr leaving the company, and full control was assumed by Ronald when Norman Snr died in 1970.

Ronald's son Bill now carries on the design tradition, again learning his trade from his father. Design work from the 1980s onwards has included ferries, police boats, pilot boats and luxury motor yachts.

References:
David Payne interview with Bill Wright 2004.
Norman Wright and Sons website. www.wrightsons.com.au